Blog - Cambridge Chamber of Commerce

While economic and technological shocks will always be a constant feature of our world, experts say small businesses must continue to adapt and innovate to stay competitive and satisfy consumer preferences.

 

“The adoption of technology should be the priority for small businesses and the adoption of AI where it can help bolster their business should also be a priority,” says Cambridge Chamber of Commerce President & CEO Greg Durocher, noting 98% of Canadian businesses qualify as small businesses.

 

In its recent report entitled, A Portrait of Small Business in Canada: Adaption, Agility, All At Once, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce touches on this issue as it explores the integral role small businesses  in play in Canada’s economy and sheds light on how these businesses can thrive despite major economic forces working against them — including the rising cost of doing business, the highest borrowing costs in over two decades and increased pandemic debt loads.

 

The report, which defines ‘micro businesses’ as having 1-4 employees, ‘scale businesses’ as 5-19 employees, and ‘mature businesses’ as 19-99 employees, shows how small businesses of all sizes, ages and industries are already investing in technology to better access data and applications from their computers, tablets, or mobile phones — whether in the office or on the road — to connect better with their customers and employees. However, as the report indicates, a business’s size is important to its ability to not only adopt technology, but also take advantage of a variety of technology tools. The report finds that even more change is essential.

 

Greg agrees and says the need for smaller businesses to adopt artificial intelligence (AI) is especially imperative.

 

“In all probability, smaller businesses are less likely to adopt AI technology because they may be fearful of it,” he says. “But the fact of the matter is it may be the only tool that can bring them up and allow them to compete.”

 

AI and digital technologies

 

According to the report, across all industries, a higher proportion of small businesses planned to invest in AI and digital technologies. While 62% of micro firms (compared with an average of 55% for all small firms) expressed plans for the latter, 30% of mature firms were keen on investing in AI compared with the all-industry average of 24% for all small businesses. Scale and mature businesses were more likely to adopt multiple technology tools, especially those in finance and insurance, professional services, and wholesale trade.

 

“If they (small businesses) don’t get knee deep in AI from a business perspective, they may be missing the boat that was inevitably sent to save them,” says Greg.

 

The report also highlights trends to help small businesses adapt to how Canadian shoppers have evolved. While online shopping accelerated as a result of the pandemic, roughly 75% of Canadian shoppers still visit physical stores for key items like groceries, clothing, automotive, electronics, home and garden, and health products. To meet consumer preferences, businesses need to implement on and offline sales strategies to reach customers.

 

In the report, the critical importance of having an enticing online commercial presence is highlighted, with 83% of Canadian retail shoppers reporting they conduct online research before they visit a store. Having physical stores near customers also supports online sales, with nearly one in 10 Canadians making purchases online from retailers located nearby.

 

“There is still an opportunity for small businesses to capitalize on local business by advertising and marketing themselves locally,” says Greg. “But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have a strong online presence and look for every opportunity in which AI can help advance your cause.”

 

Canadian Chamber President & CEO Perrin Beatty says the findings in this report provides yet another signal that more focus is needed to support growth, especially among small businesses.

 

“We can start by reducing red tape, investing in infrastructure, and enabling an innovation economy,” he said in a press release. “These fundamentals of growth will increase Canadian businesses’ ability to compete and attract investment that will benefit Canadians, their families, and our communities.”

 

Click here to read the report.

 

 

Highlights of the report:

 

  • In June 2023, there were 1.35 million businesses in Canada with paid employees. The over- whelming majority (98% of the total) were conventionally classified as “small” businesses, which collectively employed over 11 million people.
  • In the “small business” category, micro firms are by far the most common businesses type in Canada. In fact, if all businesses in Canada were sorted by employment size, the median firm would have fewer than five employees, which underscores the importance of improving our understanding of the business realities of all small firms, but especially micro firms.
  • Nearly half of all small businesses are in the following four industries: professional, scientific, and technical services; construction; retail trade; and health care and social assistance.
  • Immigrants to Canada own a disproportionate share of private sector businesses (263,850 businesses, or 25.5% of all private sector businesses) compared with their share of population (23%). One strong factor is immigrants’ high share of micro businesses (30%), in contrasts with their underrepresentation in both scale and mature enterprises.
  • The past few years have offered women more flexible work arrangements, encouraging them to find more in-demand and higher-paying jobs, while government efforts to increase the availability of affordable childcare have helped women’s labour force participation to rebound. With the transition back to the office, barriers that perpetuate gender-based differences in labour force participation threaten this progress.
  • An underrepresented group in terms of business ownership (2.2%) compared with their share of the population (22%) is persons with a disability. Given the prevalence of disability, this gap signals tremendous untapped potential for entrepreneurship, but also one with significant potential effects on socio-economic outcomes, including labour market participation.
  • The LGBTQ2+ population (4% of Canada’s total population according to the 2021 Census) is also somewhat underrepresented as business owners (3.3%), lagging most as owners of mature businesses (0.6%).
  • Although they are 5% of the country’s population, Indigenous people’s share of businesses owned remains less than half of that (2.2%), although they appear to be doing better on ownership of mature businesses, the largest type of small business.
  • The most recent data (June 2023) show that, compared with pre-pandemic conditions in December 2019, the number of businesses increased by 7.3% for large firms, 5.0% for medium firms and only 2.9% for small firms.
  • Retail sales data show that e-commerce enjoyed a massive spike early in the pandemic but have since moderated as Canadians go back to in-person shopping. The share of total retail sales from e-commerce increased rapidly from 3.7% in January 2020 to peak of 10.7% just four months later in April 2020. With the lifting of pandemic related restrictions and stores have reopened for in-person shoppers, this figure has since moderated to 5.7%.
  • In addition to age, variation by industry showed a strong trend in technology adoption. Overall, average adoption shares across all industries and all technology tools were lowest for micro firms (12%), followed by scale (16%) and then mature firms (22%). Small businesses — particularly scale and mature — in finance and insurance, information and culture, professional services and wholesale trade were consistently among those reporting the highest technology adoption rates.
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Nothing represents summer more than a barbecue.

 

The smell of food cooking on the grill and the sounds of the outdoors are a feast for the senses, especially on a warm and sunny afternoon.

 

But for many, good food is not the only reason barbecues are so popular.

“A barbecue is a meal that everyone can enjoy,” says Steve Varnasidis, General Manager of Q BBQ Public House in Cambridge, who has spent 25 years cooking on just about every surface possible. “It brings people together.”

 

James Empringham, Chef De Cuisine at Cambridge Hotel & Conference Centre, agrees.

 

“I think for myself and a lot of other people, the biggest attraction to BBQ, like any other food, is the social interaction,” he says, adding ‘breaking bread’ or this case beef, pork, seafood or chicken, is important. “It’s that aspect of standing around a BBQ, smelling that delicious food while in the company of friends and family on a hot summer day.”

 

The Farm Boy Product Development Chefs (Maria Garza, Liam Fulcher and John Cadieux) also agree and say not ‘heating up’ the kitchen is another big attraction to heading outdoors.

 

“It’s an easy clean up and the ability to cook many different foods at the same time,” says Farm Boy’s Maria Garza.

 

However, when it comes to barbecuing, there can be so many questions  surrounding not only what to put on the grill, but how to cook it?

 

So, we asked these local barbecue experts a few questions to help you host the best barbecue possible this summer:

 

1. Does the heat source matter?

* According to the Farm Boy chefs, the answer is yes since – gas vs charcoal vs wood – all give a slightly different taste profile. “For the novice, gas would be the easiest and most convenient way to grill, whereas charcoal or wood require a bit more know-how so you can regulate temperatures correctly,” says Liam Fulcher.

* For Todd Diamond, Director of Food & Beverages at Bingemans, using the proper heat source is imperative. “Ultimately, there are a number of different ways to approach a BBQ and a variety of different preparations for the meal,” he says. “The important part is matching them together to produce the best results.”

* When it comes to producing the best results, Steve at Q BBQ Public House says wood is a great heat source. “I like to mix fruit wood, like apple or cherry, and then mix it with maple or oak which are more readily available around here.”

* James and his colleague Nick Ruthardt from Cambridge Hotel & Conference Centre say flavour is everything and the right heat source can help. “Charcoal briquettes are one of the most popular heat sources and they can provide a wonderful grilled flavour. Then as you get more into BBQ and adventurous, you can start to also play around with smoking with woodchips and the different flavours they can add to the cooking process.”

 

2. What is the best thing to cook on a barbecue?

* Pork is great thing to cook on the barbecue according to Todd at Bingemans. “But I really believe the very best thing to cook is whatever you are working with on any given day,” he says. “It’s about the amazing variety of incredible meals that you can prepare, just don’t be afraid to try something new.”

* James and Nick Ruthardt also believe the possibilities are endless, including various meats, seafood, and all sorts of vegetables. “Once you dive down into it, there really isn’t much you can’t do on a BBQ or with a smoker,” says James. “Yes, some of these things take a little bit more practice than others to really get them down to perfection, but BBQ really does have a little bit of something for everyone.”

* Farm Boy Flattened chicken receives top marks from both the Farm Boy chefs and cooks up fast and crispy, while remaining moist.

* Steve at Q BBQ Public House also agrees that flattened chicken is great, providing it’s well marinated and basted on the grill.

 

3. What can be the most difficult thing to cook on a barbecue?

* For the Farm Boy chefs, they say fish and seafood can be a difficult because it can stick to the grates and can easily be overcooked. “Same applies to seafood, because it cooks so fast, you have to be careful not to overcook,” says John Cadieux.

* For Steve at Q BBQ Public House, he says cooking the perfect steak can often prove difficult. “If you’re not an expert barbecue or griller, it can be really challenging,” he says.

* For James and Nick, they insist brisket is the hardest thing on a BBQ to get done properly. “It’s hard cut of meat to get tender because it’s a very fatty piece of meat and takes a very long time for the collagens to break down so that it is super tender,” says James. “When cooking brisket, it is definitely a long game and can’t be rushed.”

* Todd at Bingeman  jokes that dessert is the toughest thing to barbecue.

 

4. What is the easiest thing a novice can cook on the barbecue?

* When it comes to simplicity, Steve at Q BBQ Public House says a really tasty homemade burger is a great thing for a novice to try. “Grill up some portobello mushrooms and put them on top, or some bacon or pineapple,” he suggests. “It’s delicious and everybody appreciates a good homemade burger.”

* The Farm Boy chefs agree and say the Farm Boy gourmet burgers are quick and easy. As well, they recommend the Farm Boy mesquite chicken wings and all beef frankfurters.

* James and Nick recommend trying some pulled pork, if a nice bone in pork shoulder slice of meat can be used. “The key to pulled pork is low and slow. One the pork shoulder is on the BBQ, all that has to be done is wait,” says James. “Fun fact, when people refer to a ‘pork butt’, they are actually referring to the widest part of the shoulder.”

* When it comes to something simple, Bingemans’ Todd Diamond also says pork chops are easy to whip up.

 

5. What are the most common mistakes you can make barbecuing?

* The Farm Boy chefs say not planning ahead is a big problem and that lighting the charcoal or wood far too late doesn’t allow the barbecue to property heat up. As well, not cleaning and greasing the grates is another mistake.

* James and Nick agree. “Starting with a grill that isn’t up to temperature will result in either burned food, undercooked food or food that just won’t come unstuck from the grill,” says James. “Another mistake I see often is people opening the lid way too much. It’s important to keep the lid shut.”

* Using a fatty slice of meat is another mistake says Steve at Q BBQ Public House, when it comes to barbecuing. He says fatty meat can lead to a great deal of smoke and flame ups.

* For Todd at Bingemans, he says using lighter fluid is a big no-no and must be avoided.  “Don’t use too much heat,” he says.

 

A few tips from the experts:

  • Don’t use too much heat
  • Be creative with veggies
  • Know your equipment inside and out
  • Don’t move the food around
  • ‘Rest’ all the meat
  • Cook food in order of how long things take to cook
  • Don’t forget the wine/beer

 

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